Writing disability – incomplete and important

Something very interesting is happening at the moment in Australian literature. Disability is beginning to be given space to express itself. And not as inspirational or tragic, but in its complexity and diversity. There is a tremendous history, of course, to writing by disabled people in Australia, but this feels like a new wave of … More Writing disability – incomplete and important

Open poet

For those of you who live in Melbourne, or nearby, I’ll be at RMIT from Monday 27th to Wednesday 28th of March. On Tuesday 28th, I’ll be opening the literal and metaphorical doors – drop in any time between 1pm and 4pm for a chat (and possibly to have your words incorporated into new poems … More Open poet

Each Map of Scars

A few years ago, I collaborated with Rachael Wenona Guy on a puppetry-poetry performance called “Ambiguous Mirrors”, which explored genetics, family resemblances and secrets, and loss. This new show – featuring also Leonie Van Eyk and Rose Turtle Ertler – includes “Ambiguous Mirrors”, plus two more, “Secessionist” and “Unfinished”. It explores bodily difference from the … More Each Map of Scars

(Not) hating poetry

So, I’ve survived the first year of my PhD on poetry. One of the risks of academia, they say (whoever they are), is a kind of creativity-crushing self-consciousness, knowing too much for your own good. Also, doing what you love as a job, or as the primary focus of your life, can sometimes bring you … More (Not) hating poetry

That knocking

I didn’t quite expect this, but I’m about to release another collection of poems. That knocking is a short collection, just 7 poems, but one I’m excited to see released. Sometimes there are poems that sit neatly in a full-length thematic book, but often some poems just don’t – they’re loners, awkward in crowds, not … More That knocking

Three ways of staging bodily difference

I’m no theatre critic, and this is not a review. Although I’ve performed, I feel like I approach theatre (like many other things) from the outside. I’m interested in how bodies experience each other, how people come together around something ostensibly fictional which can also be excruciatingly real. In the last few weeks, I saw … More Three ways of staging bodily difference

the unavoidable prefix

How do you know if someone is disabled?  A wheelchair?  Missing limbs?  Dark glasses and a guide dog?  There are those cliched visual cues, but of course, people can be disabled in very subtle or entirely invisible ways.  Psychological disorder, extreme fatigue, even chronic pain can be difficult to discern in casual encounters.  And there … More the unavoidable prefix